5 New Collections to Enhance the Home Office

Classic color and contemporary sleekness both hold court.

The home office—or a dedicated work space—has never been a more universal want or requirement than in the past two years. But your work area doesn’t need to emulate the office and look like a cubicle, consisting of gray commercial furnishings with the only sign of life being a few framed photos of loved ones. We’ve selected some upscale options that will blend seamlessly into a home. Now you won’t dread “going to the office.”

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MARK D. SIKES FOR CHADDOCK

Presenting his second collaboration with Chaddock, Mark D. Sikes envisioned three scenarios: city, coastal and country. Each grouping bears his mark of casual elegance and includes a mix of case goods and upholstered pieces—with influences of Swedish, English, French and Asian design—distinguished in Sikes’ all-American style. Layered in texture and patina, the furnishings resemble heirlooms updated for today’s lifestyle. Sikes maintains that every piece is something that he would personally want to use for a design project or in his own home. His mantra: “I believe in curating, collecting and customizing to ensure homes will look as good in a decade as they do today.”

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MEG BRAFF FOR WILDWOOD

It seemed a natural fit for designer Meg Braff to team up with Wildwood—her go-to source for projects for over 20 years. The debut collection shows off a playful resort style in hues of blues, greens and white with cane, palm leaf and plaster motifs. “When I began thinking about an overarching theme for the Meg Braff x Wildwood collection, Palm Beach just made sense,” says Braff. “I love looking at old pictures of people and parties from the 1950s and ’60s and shopping for furniture and lighting of that era on Antiques Row in West Palm. The collection is devoted to pieces I’ve admired, been inspired by, purchased and used on design projects or always hoped to find while antiquing. It’s sort of a dream collection of midcentury Palm Beach.”

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ALEXA HAMPTON FOR THEODORE ALEXANDER

“My love of travel and my respect for many different design eras always guide my hand when working on introductions to a collection,” notes Alexa Hampton. The latest additions to her eponymous line for Theodore Alexander resonate with historical references. “I like to create pieces that are as diverse and eclectic as my design work and that, selfishly, I would be able to buy and use for my clients. As an example, my new introductions include chairs inspired by the Egyptian revival movement, classical Greece, Louis XV’s and Napoleon III’s courts, all the way up to the designs of America’s midcentury.” Hampton designed a variety of plush upholstery pieces in jewel tones, like the Wingate sofa shown here, perfectly suited for lounging. 

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DAVID PHOENIX FOR HICKORY CHAIR

Hickory Chair unveiled the Positano Collection by designer David Phoenix, presenting 25 pieces of upholstery and case goods. “I named the collection Positano because, to me, it’s always been the pinnacle of laid-back glamour,” says Phoenix. “I wanted to bring that sensibility home.” The aesthetic is a modern interpretation of classic and midcentury styles, and the furniture lends itself to both formal and casual settings in a palette of rich, dark stains and light-toned painted finishes. The Sydney dresser features an ebony finish on American ash with upholstered drawer fronts and jewelry-inspired pulls and ferrules in solid brass. Phoenix explains, “The hardware is inspired by a pair of vintage earrings from one of my favorite jewelers, David Webb.” 

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LAURA KIRAR FOR MCGUIRE

Designer Laura Kirar layers urban modernity and natural elements in her 16-piece capsule collection for McGuire. The assemblage encompasses a thoughtful selection of tables and upholstered seating, featuring raw textures and organic materials in oak, rattan, rawhide, cane and marble. “My vision for this collection,” says Kirar, “was to capture the distinctive elemental materials found within nature and add a global, modern perspective.”