Analisse Taft enlivens vintage silk screens

Taft visited an old mill in Red Hook, Brooklyn, and stumbled across thousands of vintage silk screens. She saved the screens from an untimely demise and commissioned the factory to use them to make her 16-pattern fabric line, Living Vintage...



As a young teenage model, Analisse Taft quickly learned that what looked glamorous on the outside was in reality all about business. “As a model, you’re ultimately running your own company,” she says, a lesson learned and deftly applied to the four-year-old SoHo showroom she owns today, ALT for Living. Her vision was to have a one-stop-shopping emporium housing bespoke fabrics, floor coverings, and furnishings, some of which she has discovered on her travels abroad but many of which are handmade by artisans within a 50-mile radius. “Decorators and architects come in here and really enjoy the process of looking,” she says. “They aren’t on their hands and knees digging around—they can see everything all at once.”


Soon after opening her showroom, Taft visited an old mill in Red Hook, Brooklyn, and while rummaging around the Civil War–era building (“You feel like you’ve literally stepped into a time machine”), she stumbled across thousands of vintage silk screens, some of which date from the 1940s. “They were tossed around like scrap wood and were going to be burned,” she says. Taft saved the screens from an untimely demise and commissioned the factory to use them to make her new 16-pattern fabric line, Living Vintage. “I hadn’t ever tried fabric design—or printing, for that matter—but it was such an organic process. I’m putting these prints back into the world. It’s actually quite romantic.”