Author: Alexa Stevenson

"This house, and every house that McAlpine does, has individual distinctive soul."

With one foot in the past and one in the future, designer Michael Whaley updates a former project to meet his clients' changing tastes.

The 70-acre farm was “an architect’s dream.”

The shoes were fabulous, naturally, but after five years, it’s still the sets of the Sex and the City movie and its sequel—especially that envy-inducing closet Carrie shares with Big in Sex and the City 2—that design lovers covet. The vision behind the set that launched a thousand swoons belongs to Lydia Marks and Lisa Frantz of Marks & Frantz, a New York City–based design firm whose movie sets have residential clients knocking down their door. A Greenwich homeowner approached the pair not just for the closet but also for the designers’ signature high-voltage glamour coupled with functionality.

The shoes were fabulous, naturally, but after five years, it’s still the sets of the Sex and the City movie and its sequel—especially that envy-inducing closet Carrie shares with Big in Sex and the City 2—that design lovers covet. The vision behind the set that launched a thousand swoons belongs to Lydia Marks and Lisa Frantz of Marks & Frantz, a New York City–based design firm whose movie sets have residential clients knocking down their door. A Greenwich homeowner approached the pair not just for the closet but also for the designers’ signature high-voltage glamour coupled with functionality.

In the case of a 1970s Colonial-style house in Southampton, a casual question about tile led to a complete gut renovation. Designers Alexandra Pappas and Tatyana Miron, the principals of Pappas Miron Design, were working on their clients’ bathroom renovation in the city when the owners purchased a house in Southampton and nonchalantly asked whether the duo thought the kitchen tile would be easy to change.

In the case of a 1970s Colonial-style house in Southampton, a casual question about tile led to a complete gut renovation. Designers Alexandra Pappas and Tatyana Miron, the principals of Pappas Miron Design, were working on their clients’ bathroom renovation in the city when the owners purchased a house in Southampton and nonchalantly asked whether the duo thought the kitchen tile would be easy to change.

Design partners Mary Foley & Michael Cox and would say they don’t have a signature style, exactly, but if you look closely at any of their projects, you’ll see a common thread: sumptuous, elegant and comfortable interiors. There’s an underlying tone of quiet sophistication, but each project is uniquely its own. For clients who bought a Greenwich property intent on transforming it into their dream home, the designers had no trouble getting to know their tastes and personalities. They brought in architect Cormac Byrne, with Jones Byrne Margeotes Partners, to gut the interior and modernize the exterior by changing the color palette to a more natural shingle color and reconfiguring the entrance.

Design partners Mary Foley & Michael Cox and would say they don’t have a signature style, exactly, but if you look closely at any of their projects, you’ll see a common thread: sumptuous, elegant and comfortable interiors. There’s an underlying tone of quiet sophistication, but each project is uniquely its own. For clients who bought a Greenwich property intent on transforming it into their dream home, the designers had no trouble getting to know their tastes and personalities. They brought in architect Cormac Byrne, with Jones Byrne Margeotes Partners, to gut the interior and modernize the exterior by changing the color palette to a more natural shingle color and reconfiguring the entrance.

In the real estate market, square footage reigns supreme. But is it true that bigger is always better? Not necessarily, according to architectural designer Ritch Holben of RH Designs.

Thanks to Netflix, we know that orange is the new black. But a vibrant house proves that orange isn’t alone: Apple green, Chinese red and a host of other colors are having their moment. “I’ve always enjoyed a lot of color—probably overdone it!” says the homeowner. “And I’ve always had color where I lived, but have played with different spectrums.” When she and her family moved into a traditional shingle-style house, she wanted to belie its traditional exterior with a bold statement inside. “When I looked for a designer,” she says, “I focused on designers who used colors I liked.”

Thanks to Netflix, we know that orange is the new black. But a vibrant house proves that orange isn’t alone: Apple green, Chinese red and a host of other colors are having their moment. “I’ve always enjoyed a lot of color—probably overdone it!” says the homeowner. “And I’ve always had color where I lived, but have played with different spectrums.” When she and her family moved into a traditional shingle-style house, she wanted to belie its traditional exterior with a bold statement inside. “When I looked for a designer,” she says, “I focused on designers who used colors I liked.”

A 1950s Colonial Revival in Greenwich was too charming to pass up for a young family relocating from New York City. The color palette wasn’t the only historical relic in the house, though, nothing had been touched architecturally since the house was built.

It’s a common conundrum that most modern-day parents can easily relate to: that moment when a couple realizes that their lives are more about getting their kids to eat their vegetables than getting a table at Per Se. For a couple in Greenwich,environment was found in a surprising place, the hair salon.

It's like the woman who has had the same hairstyle since high school,” says designer Ellie Cullman. “You have to change and grow if you want to stay modern.” Cullman, cofounder of Manhattan’s venerable decorating firm Cullman & Kravis, practices what she preaches, duly noted in the style evolution of her firm’s inimitable work. Firmly rooted in the traditional, Cullman’s approach to decor has evolved over the past decade: There’s a more modern bent to her classical roots, giving her interiors a younger and fresher feel.

It's like the woman who has had the same hairstyle since high school,” says designer Ellie Cullman. “You have to change and grow if you want to stay modern.” Cullman, cofounder of Manhattan’s venerable decorating firm Cullman & Kravis, practices what she preaches, duly noted in the style evolution of her firm’s inimitable work. Firmly rooted in the traditional, Cullman’s approach to decor has evolved over the past decade: There’s a more modern bent to her classical roots, giving her interiors a younger and fresher feel.

Originally built in 1917, Greenwich’s downtown post office has been resurrected as RH’s (née Restoration Hardware) newest location. Opening this month, RH Greenwich: The Gallery at the Historic Post Office follows the success of the transformation of Boston’s Museum of Natural History into the retailer’s 40,000-square-foot design gallery.

After 15-plus years of weekending in the Hamptons, Prounis had decided it was time to settle in a permanent home with her family, so she and her husband purchased a traditional Cape Cod in Bridgehampton with the intention of tearing it down. But while waiting for the phone to ring and the sound of her contractor’s voice on the other end of the line, summer was fast approaching. So Prounis did what could be done with the house as it was, at least to get through the season. Much to her surprise, “the place really grew on us,” she recalls.