Author: Barbara L. Dixon

A fashion designer–turned–interior designer builds his dream home in East Hampton.

For a brief time, people priced out of SoHo and Greenwich Village found happy refuge in the former factory and industrial spaces lining NoHo’s somewhat gritty streets, a loose grid that was never really on the map until suddenly it was, marketed heavily by real estate companies and given over, seemingly overnight, to a burgeoning crowd of young professionals looking for a place to call home.

For a brief time, people priced out of SoHo and Greenwich Village found happy refuge in the former factory and industrial spaces lining NoHo’s somewhat gritty streets, a loose grid that was never really on the map until suddenly it was, marketed heavily by real estate companies and given over, seemingly overnight, to a burgeoning crowd of young professionals looking for a place to call home.

Architect James D’Auria and his wife, Jennifer, a real estate agent, lived for some 15 years in a home James designed on a bucolic plot of farmland in Amagansett. When he built the house, a shingled but modern-inflected structure that references the East End’s barn vernacular, the couple also had a place in Manhattan. But they were spending so little time in town, they eventually gave it up.

Architect James D’Auria and his wife, Jennifer, a real estate agent, lived for some 15 years in a home James designed on a bucolic plot of farmland in Amagansett. When he built the house, a shingled but modern-inflected structure that references the East End’s barn vernacular, the couple also had a place in Manhattan. But they were spending so little time in town, they eventually gave it up.

As a trained chef and owner of the Tribeca restaurant Mulberry & Vine, Michelle Gauthier sees a lot of the kitchen. But since opening the restaurant three years ago, she has found it increasingly difficult to spend time in her own kitchen at her Sagaponack home.

As a trained chef and owner of the Tribeca restaurant Mulberry & Vine, Michelle Gauthier sees a lot of the kitchen. But since opening the restaurant three years ago, she has found it increasingly difficult to spend time in her own kitchen at her Sagaponack home.

Located on Long Island’s North Shore, just a 30-minute drive from New York City. International travelers with a growing, eclectic art collection, charged Designer Mark Epstein with creating a worldly environment that was also family-friendly.

With its expansive avenues and proximity to Central Park, the Upper East Side has a cachet that few other Manhattan neighborhoods can rival—especially for New Yorkers looking for a quiet retreat from the more congested parts of the city.

At their sun-filled 1980s house in East Hampton, Joseph and Mireya D’Angelo incorporate pops of vibrant color.

To transform their historic house effortlessly and elegantly, a Bridgehampton couple hires the decorator of their dreams.

Streamlined and sophisticated, Joe Macal's East End cottage is a study in disciplined design.

A rustic Bridgehampton house is transformed into a streamlined, ultra-chic getaway.

Bridgehampton-based architect Kathrine McCoy becomes her own client—with predictably stellar results.

Upon the publication of her new book, Luna & Lola, photographer and writer Priscilla Rattazzi relishes the good life with her husband, Chris Whittle, three children and their dogs at home on Georgica Pond