Author: Bianca Bufi

Despite having its own private beach and wraparound views of Peconic Bay, the five-bedroom, 8,000-square-foot mid-20th-century home at the edge of a peninsula had been languishing on the market forever. The structure’s slapdash exterior and gloomy interior spaces—heavy mahogany woodwork and crown molding, red wallpaper, brass chandeliers, and view-obscuring mullioned windows—had discouraged buyers for years. Then the recession gave the listing a little nudge forward.

Despite having its own private beach and wraparound views of Peconic Bay, the five-bedroom, 8,000-square-foot mid-20th-century home at the edge of a peninsula had been languishing on the market forever. The structure’s slapdash exterior and gloomy interior spaces—heavy mahogany woodwork and crown molding, red wallpaper, brass chandeliers, and view-obscuring mullioned windows—had discouraged buyers for years. Then the recession gave the listing a little nudge forward.

Although some people might argue that Greenwich Village has sold its soul to commercial interests—just take a stroll down Bleecker Street—countless artists, writers, and musicians still make their homes in its historic row houses. The four-story redbrick charmer on these pages is a rescue, lifted from years of abuse by loving owners and the talents of designer Steven Gambrel, whose office is only a few blocks away, off Sheridan Square.

High atop New York's legendary police building, Michael Bagley of MB Designers creates an elegant living scheme that works for a busy 21st-century family. Still retaining its original brick walls, the space now acts as a casual family crash pad, complete with a grand piano for impromptu recitals.

High atop New York's legendary police building, Michael Bagley of MB Designers creates an elegant living scheme that works for a busy 21st-century family. Still retaining its original brick walls, the space now acts as a casual family crash pad, complete with a grand piano for impromptu recitals.