Author: Cara Greenberg

The house is a study in how to decorate a rental simply and stylishly.

It takes rare vision and prodigious creativity to carve a family home out of a former cinderblock factory, especially one on a steeply sloping Sagaponack lot that had once been quarried for sand. “Basically, we bought a crater covered with weeds and out-of-control poison ivy,” says homeowner Quentin Curry, a multidisciplinary artist and self-styled “idea guy” whose unique talents enabled him, along with his wife, fashion designer Shelley Suh, and Sag Harbor architect Nilay Oza, to create an unconventional 4,600-square-foot compound with what Curry calls “a rural, industrial ranch vibe.”

It takes rare vision and prodigious creativity to carve a family home out of a former cinderblock factory, especially one on a steeply sloping Sagaponack lot that had once been quarried for sand. Artist Quentin Curry and his wife, Fashion Designer Shelley Suh enlists the help of Sag Harbor Architect Nilay Oza.

The frenzied pace of development in New York City’s hottest borough has made untouched Brooklyn brownstones scarce. An up-and-coming decorator and her adventurous clients rev up a late-19th-century Brooklyn brownstone. In 2010, Benjamin and Jennifer Whitfield, émigrés from Manhattan, found just such a house in Carroll Gardens.

The frenzied pace of development in New York City’s hottest borough has made untouched Brooklyn brownstones scarce. An up-and-coming decorator and her adventurous clients rev up a late-19th-century Brooklyn brownstone. In 2010, Benjamin and Jennifer Whitfield, émigrés from Manhattan, found just such a house in Carroll Gardens.

The sight lines within the house are exceptionally long. From the entryway, one sees through the soaring living room into the kitchen, and then, through French doors, to the bluestone patio beyond, topped with a pergola on which Merlot grapevines grow. Light floods in through skylights and an abundance of windows. “I wanted views of the outside from every room,” says Tracey.

Bucks calls it a “spiffing-up,” rather than a renovation. “We didn’t move a single wall,” she says, nor did they need to raise the peaked ceilings in the combined entryway/living room or the two en suite bedrooms. As many families do, the Buckses spend most of their time in the large kitchen/dining area and the inviting brick patio and swimming pool just outside, both of which were in place when they bought the house.

Interior designer Deborah Heimowitz creates a casually eclectic home in a 1911 carriage house designed by Grosvenor Atterbury.

A distinctive wedge-shaped house by legendary Bridgehampton architect Norman Jaffe gets a respectful renovation.

The house is the primary residence of couple Jennifer Mable and Austin Handler, who wanted the interior of their home to say "beach house," but not "casual beach house." "So 'sophisticated beach' became our mantra," Mabley recalls. The clients favored a cool palette—pale oyster gray with a hint of blue—that for them recalls the ocean and sandy beaches on a misty day. "The serene palette was a parameter that helped us zero in on a look and style," Mabley says.

The house is the primary residence of couple Jennifer Mable and Austin Handler, who wanted the interior of their home to say "beach house," but not "casual beach house." "So 'sophisticated beach' became our mantra," Mabley recalls. The clients favored a cool palette—pale oyster gray with a hint of blue—that for them recalls the ocean and sandy beaches on a misty day. "The serene palette was a parameter that helped us zero in on a look and style," Mabley says.

Antique furnishings and eclectic collections add extra patina to a pre-Revolutionary house in East Hampton

Antique furnishings and eclectic collections add extra patina to a pre-Revolutionary house in East Hampton.

With the help of her friend Jack Ceglic, Susan Penzner reinvents a 1965 Sag Harbor rambler.

At Phyllis Landi’s teeny, stylish digs in Sag Harbor, space is not a priority—especially given its killer water views.

In his comfortable, inviting East Hampton home, 
Miami-based decorator Michael Katz proves how a minimal palette of black, gray, cream and brown can be downright decadent

Scott and Kathy Formby, co-creators of the new fashion label No.1808, apply their carefully honed aesthetic at home in Amagansett, in a 1982 house designed by Julian and Barbara Neski