Author: Cindi Cook

To keep things simple , the designer settled on a Scandinavian-style palette of beige, white, and gray.

Designer Farrin Cary honored the home's character by retaining its 19th-century integrity while giving it modern layers.

B Five Studio's Franklin Salasky gives modern polish to a classic structure.

Bill Beeton and Julia Hubbard keep things comfy and casual at their family home in Redwood.

Interior designer Carmiña Roth infused a young family's Hamptons retreat with a fresh, summery style.

Designer Darci Hether lends her clean-lined aesthetic to a classic Hamptons home.

Designer Noha Hassan takes a warm, inviting approach to modern style.

A 1970s Contemporary gets a total redo in the hands of designer Rina Pertusi.

The view out the front window reminded designer Lynne Scalo of Paris and became her point of inspiration.

Designer Mary Young infused the with space with vibrant prints and functional furniture.

For fashion editor and new-media maven Cricket Burns, life is a mix of color, memories, Mick Jagger, and Chanel.

Maya’s traditional sensibility appealed to his clients as well, as did the nontraditional elements he introduced.

Posh and Becks are at it again—no, not posing scantily clad in the pages of fashion magazines, but buying and selling real estate.

"It was a weird obsession. We just knew this was where we were supposed to be."

Interior designer Katharine Pooley works her magic at the compound in the English countryside.

A Southampton home with the perfect balance of historic charm and modern flair.

"It's an enchanting cottage in my own private jungle," says decorator Larry Laslo.

The traditional saltbox on a sizable three acres in Millerton, NY piqued Willey's interest during a late-night session of cyber browsing.

Designer Garrow Kedigian knows a thing or two about elegance.

Maybe it’s the thrice-weekly yoga that helps Amy Lau recharge. Or the twice-daily meditation sessions, or just a fierce love for what she does. In addition to being a top-tier decorator, Lau has created installations for Kohler, Bergdorf Goodman, and Showtime, co-created the Design Miami fair, made appearances on HGTV and LX.TV, acted as a media spokesperson for Benjamin Moore, designed textile collections for numerous companies, and been recognized for her achievements with an honorary doctorate from the New York School of Interior Design.

Maybe it’s the thrice-weekly yoga that helps Amy Lau recharge. Or the twice-daily meditation sessions, or just a fierce love for what she does. In addition to being a top-tier decorator, Lau has created installations for Kohler, Bergdorf Goodman, and Showtime, co-created the Design Miami fair, made appearances on HGTV and LX.TV, acted as a media spokesperson for Benjamin Moore, designed textile collections for numerous companies, and been recognized for her achievements with an honorary doctorate from the New York School of Interior Design.

Some people collect baseball cards, and others vintage cars. Some even collect more offbeat objects, like moon rocks or Pez dispensers. Still others, like designer Wendy Seewagen, collect houses. The decorator loves the adventure of reinventing a structure entirely, and thinks nothing of knocking down a wall or constructing a staircase from scratch. What’s more, she would rather do the work by herself. A chore? Not for her.

Like most industries, the world of interior design is a competitive one. Even people with no training can decide to call themselves “decorators” and hang up their shingles, further populating an already crowded field. No one knows who will be the next Sister Parish or Mario Buatta, and especially in Manhattan, it’s more difficult than ever to stand out.

Some people collect baseball cards, and others vintage cars. Some even collect more offbeat objects, like moon rocks or Pez dispensers. Still others, like designer Wendy Seewagen, collect houses. The decorator loves the adventure of reinventing a structure entirely, and thinks nothing of knocking down a wall or constructing a staircase from scratch. What’s more, she would rather do the work by herself. A chore? Not for her.

Like most industries, the world of interior design is a competitive one. Even people with no training can decide to call themselves “decorators” and hang up their shingles, further populating an already crowded field. No one knows who will be the next Sister Parish or Mario Buatta, and especially in Manhattan, it’s more difficult than ever to stand out.

Houses by the water take Robert Young back to his childhood. A native of Boston, the architect grew up near the coast, where sailing was customary, as was owning a boat—particularly in his family, since his father was a boat dealer and built intricate model ships for fun. “The craftsmanship that goes into a boat is a balance between form and function,” Young says. “It’s similar to what I do when I design a house.”

Morning runs have a way of clearing the head and exposing people to new possibilities, which is precisely what happened when Luke Babcock took off on an early a.m. jog one day in 2010. The couple—she an interior designer, he a finance professional—had moved to the Hamptons from New York City in 2003 and had been living in a traditional house nearby. But they were eager to find a more expansive home for themselves and their daughters. They also wanted to create a home they could really call their own—built from the ground up.

Houses by the water take Robert Young back to his childhood. A native of Boston, the architect grew up near the coast, where sailing was customary, as was owning a boat—particularly in his family, since his father was a boat dealer and built intricate model ships for fun. “The craftsmanship that goes into a boat is a balance between form and function,” Young says. “It’s similar to what I do when I design a house.”