Author: Heather Buchanan

Industrial designer Miles Jaffe undertakes a renovation and expansion of a Water Mill modern originally built in 1975 by his architect father.

Entertainment industry legend Dick Cavett says farewell to his beloved Montauk home, known as "Tick Hall."

Painter David Kratz, who is the president of the New York Academy of Art, and his husband, Greg Unis, the CEO of Victoria's Secret Beauty, enjoy a life well lived in a home well loved.

Painter David Kratz, who is the president of the New York Academy of Art, and his husband, Greg Unis, the CEO of Victoria's Secret Beauty, enjoy a life well lived in a home well loved.

In Sag Harbor, decorator David Kleinberg creates a dreamy landing pad for a world diplomat and traveler.

Called the "Green House," Roger Ferris's contemporary gem is a state-of-the-art model of modern living.

On Davis Creek in Southampton, Tim Davis and his wife Susan built their family's forever home.

Toni Ross's home and studio exude comfort, warmth and elegance.

A Buddha water fountain marks the formal entrance to the house, at the end of a long, winding drive.

A telling clue to the Swedish mindset is the popular word lagom, which roughly translates to “everything in moderation,” meaning anything flashy or boastful doesn’t fly. Most Swedes would be appalled not only at the American McMansion, but even at the very notion of ensuite bedrooms and baths. For Kristina and Tommy Lindhe, the owners of the home accessories and fashion firm Lexington Company, their house in Bromma, an attractive suburb of Stockholm, might be modest in size, but it’s vastly rich in family history and importance.

A telling clue to the Swedish mindset is the popular word lagom, which roughly translates to “everything in moderation,” meaning anything flashy or boastful doesn’t fly. Most Swedes would be appalled not only at the American McMansion, but even at the very notion of ensuite bedrooms and baths. For Kristina and Tommy Lindhe, the owners of the home accessories and fashion firm Lexington Company, their house in Bromma, an attractive suburb of Stockholm, might be modest in size, but it’s vastly rich in family history and importance.

For Alice Netter, walking into her new Hamptons beach house in 1977 required vision—as well as a tool belt. “It was pretty bad,” she says. “There was a turquoise floor and metal valances with pompons. For the first two months, I walked around with a screwdriver in my pocket, taking everything down.”

For Alice Netter, walking into her new Hamptons beach house in 1977 required vision—as well as a tool belt. “It was pretty bad,” she says. “There was a turquoise floor and metal valances with pompons. For the first two months, I walked around with a screwdriver in my pocket, taking everything down.”

Most people would guess that the home of an architect and interior designer is always the biggest and baddest on the block. Not so when it comes to Campion Platt. Nestled in a neighborhood of iron-gated fortresses in the heart of Water Mill, the waterfront bungalow that he shares with his wife, Tatiana, and their three children is anything but amped up. “We’re the last holdouts,” he says. “We’re like the Clampetts!”

Most people would guess that the home of an architect and interior designer is always the biggest and baddest on the block. Not so when it comes to Campion Platt. Nestled in a neighborhood of iron-gated fortresses in the heart of Water Mill, the waterfront bungalow that he shares with his wife, Tatiana, and their three children is anything but amped up. “We’re the last holdouts,” he says. “We’re like the Clampetts!”

Despite superstorms and the ever-growing threat of climate change, people will always want to live on the water. Christopher Burnside of Brown Harris Stevens has a brand-new $3.695 million waterfront listing in Sag Harbor that could satisfy many a water baby. As for oceanfront homes, Halcyon Lodge on Gin Lane, the former estate of Henry Ford II, is listed for $19.9 million with Tim Davis and Zachary and Cody Vichinsky of Corcoran, and Harald Grant of Sotheby’s International Realty.

Nothing remains of the original 1652 manor home that belonged to Nathaniel Sylvester, his wife, Grizzell, and their 11 children, although Grizzell’s boxwoods, the cuttings of which were brought from England, still tower over the gardens. The pretty house that stands here now dates from 1737, when Nathaniel’s grandson, Brinley Sylvester, leveled the original structure to create a gentleman’s farm with a new home—the oldest extant Georgian on the East End, according to Maura Doyle, Sylvester Manor’s historic preservation and programs coordinator. The front parlor’s original paneling has received only two coats of paint: Prussian Blue, applied in 1737, and a modest biscuit color, added in 1842.

There was a time when Bobby Van’s was home to regular customers like Truman Capote, James Jones, and George Plimpton; artists like Willem de Kooning rode around town on a Royce Union three-speed bicycle; playwrights like Wendy Wasserstein penned The Heidi Chronicles in a Bridgehampton carriage house; and Jackson Pollock traded paintings for food at the Springs General Store.