Author: Photographs by Joe Fletcher

John Maniscalco Architecture drew inspiration from the rugged landscape to create this modern getaway.

We didn’t want a pristine, untouched space,” says Anamarie “Pink” Pasdar of the 2,800-square-foot carriage house in the Mission that she and her husband, former Apple executive Iain Newton, spent more than a year renovating. “The fact that we didn’t need a car to be in the center of the action was another plus. After years spent living in New York and London, this particular house—with its funky ’70s bohemian vibe and great flow—just felt like home.”

The transition from traditional residence to urban dwelling can be jarring for some, but for the owner of a newly converted loft in Russian Hill, it was a revelation. The abundant light, generous volumes and industrial materials of her dramatic new residence, sited in a former mechanic’s stable transformed by San Francisco–based firm Ogrydziak Prillinger Architects (OPA), proved to be the perfect conditions for showcasing her soulful collection of art and objects.

The transition from traditional residence to urban dwelling can be jarring for some, but for the owner of a newly converted loft in Russian Hill, it was a revelation. The abundant light, generous volumes and industrial materials of her dramatic new residence, sited in a former mechanic’s stable transformed by San Francisco–based firm Ogrydziak Prillinger Architects (OPA), proved to be the perfect conditions for showcasing her soulful collection of art and objects.

Cantilevered white planes, graphic shadows and pure Modernist lines distinguish the façade of a building that sits at a point where Cow Hollow juts out and overlooks Pacific Heights. “It was built in 1959, and it was, well, ugly,” says architect Julie Dowling, recalling her first impressions.

Cantilevered white planes, graphic shadows and pure Modernist lines distinguish the façade of a building that sits at a point where Cow Hollow juts out and overlooks Pacific Heights. “It was built in 1959, and it was, well, ugly,” says architect Julie Dowling, recalling her first impressions.

We didn’t want a pristine, untouched space,” says Anamarie “Pink” Pasdar of the 2,800-square-foot carriage house in the Mission that she and her husband, former Apple executive Iain Newton, spent more than a year renovating. “The fact that we didn’t need a car to be in the center of the action was another plus. After years spent living in New York and London, this particular house—with its funky ’70s bohemian vibe and great flow—just felt like home.”

When architect Brandon Jørgensen first presented his sketches for a Napa Valley home to his clients, he could sense their lack of enthusiasm. The couple had originally approached him with a request for a traditional Napa Valley farmhouse, Jørgensen decided to go for broke and present them with his kind of architecture: straight-up modern.

When architect Brandon Jørgensen first presented his sketches for a Napa Valley home to his clients, he could sense their lack of enthusiasm. The couple had originally approached him with a request for a traditional Napa Valley farmhouse, Jørgensen decided to go for broke and present them with his kind of architecture: straight-up modern.

When bi-coastal photographer Thayer Gowdy set out to renovate her San Francisco home, she sought help from a good friend, who just happened to be renowned architect Craig Steely. Known for his cutting-edge, modernist structures, Steely found inspiration for transforming the 1908 Edwardian within combination of old and new.

One week before San Francisco’s Bay Lights project went live, gallery owner Lisa Dolby Chadwick and her partner, Ian Schmidt, hosted a fundraiser in their home to benefit the hugely popular Bay Bridge art installation. In attendance was Leo Villareal, creator of the work composed of 25,000 LED lights, who thrilled the guests when he switched on the artwork via his computer. “Everyone gasped,” recalls Dolby Chadwick, whose Russian Hill perch provided the perfect vantage point. “We were all gathered in what we call ‘the view room’ for the magic moment.”

One week before San Francisco’s Bay Lights project went live, gallery owner Lisa Dolby Chadwick and her partner, Ian Schmidt, hosted a fundraiser in their home to benefit the hugely popular Bay Bridge art installation. In attendance was Leo Villareal, creator of the work composed of 25,000 LED lights, who thrilled the guests when he switched on the artwork via his computer. “Everyone gasped,” recalls Dolby Chadwick, whose Russian Hill perch provided the perfect vantage point. “We were all gathered in what we call ‘the view room’ for the magic moment.”

Architect Daniel Piechota of San Francisco–based Sagan Piechota Architecture faced exactly that challenge when commissioned to design a Monterey Bay house for a couple who met 29 years ago and knew, from their very first conversation, that one day they would have a house on the beach. “We’d been looking for a property for forever, truly forever, and for some reason nothing ever clicked,” one of the clients says. “And then this little cul-de-sac popped up.”