Author: Photographs by John Gruen

Each room of this Litchfield County home has its own defined character

In Pound Ridge, designer Garrow Kedigian takes a client’s new digs from spec house to spectacular.

While it complements the vernacular of Connecticut's northwest corner, this home represents a pull toward the modern end of the design spectrum.

Their home is a showcase for their almost endless collections.

This year's blooming season promises to be better than ever.

With one foot in the past and one in the future, designer Michael Whaley updates a former project to meet his clients' changing tastes.

According to interior designer Alicia Orrick, even before they met, her client had very clear parameters about where he wanted to live. This included being on the water in Rowayton in a house that didn’t mandate any renovation. “Houses meeting those requirements are scarce at best,” says Orrick. “But he actually found a classic New England shingle-style home built in 2005 in pristine condition.”

According to interior designer Alicia Orrick, even before they met, her client had very clear parameters about where he wanted to live. This included being on the water in Rowayton in a house that didn’t mandate any renovation. “Houses meeting those requirements are scarce at best,” says Orrick. “But he actually found a classic New England shingle-style home built in 2005 in pristine condition.”

Ask Jane Bescherer why the home she has lived in for 43 years seems to have an enchanted quality and she will tell you it’s about the trees, or the light, or the handcrafted furnishings and antiques hand-picked over decades. What she doesn’t say is that house is really about her—not in a narcissistic sense, but in a way that is so deeply personal that you’d be inclined to describe it as having soul.

Ask Jane Bescherer why the home she has lived in for 43 years seems to have an enchanted quality and she will tell you it’s about the trees, or the light, or the handcrafted furnishings and antiques hand-picked over decades. What she doesn’t say is that house is really about her—not in a narcissistic sense, but in a way that is so deeply personal that you’d be inclined to describe it as having soul.

Interior designer Susan Bednar Long probably would not claim color as her strongest suit. Sure, her projects feature well-integrated threads of blue here and some bold red accents there. But by her own admission, she’s no Jamie Drake (well known for his exuberant palettes). So, when a New York City couple tapped Long to design a weekend getaway that felt nothing like their full-time Tribeca digs, a monotone study in gray, she took a giant step outside her comfort zone.

Interior designer Susan Bednar Long probably would not claim color as her strongest suit. Sure, her projects feature well-integrated threads of blue here and some bold red accents there. But by her own admission, she’s no Jamie Drake (well known for his exuberant palettes). So, when a New York City couple tapped Long to design a weekend getaway that felt nothing like their full-time Tribeca digs, a monotone study in gray, she took a giant step outside her comfort zone.

Cruising through the picturesque countryside of Washington is like taking a journey back in architectural time. The Georgian, Greek Revival and shingle-style homes often paired with 19th-century barns or mill structures that dot the landscape represent the best of New England’s classic vernacular. Not surprisingly, many people who move there feel an obligation to maintain the status quo, and a Manhattan couple looking to set down part-time roots was no exception.

Cruising through the picturesque countryside of Washington is like taking a journey back in architectural time. The Georgian, Greek Revival and shingle-style homes often paired with 19th-century barns or mill structures that dot the landscape represent the best of New England’s classic vernacular. Not surprisingly, many people who move there feel an obligation to maintain the status quo, and a Manhattan couple looking to set down part-time roots was no exception.

When Michael Halpern found a neglected 1800s farmhouse in the Merryall section of New Milford, he fell in love with the home’s location and the way it was sited with a magnificent view of protected farmland belonging to the Weantinoge Heritage Land Trust.

When Michael Halpern found a neglected 1800s farmhouse in the Merryall section of New Milford, he fell in love with the home’s location and the way it was sited with a magnificent view of protected farmland belonging to the Weantinoge Heritage Land Trust.

A one-room redo sparks a complete home-design success story.