Author: Linda O'Keeffe

Jack Calhoun's home is a backdrop for a life well lived.

Designer Kelly Hohla and architect Shay Zak create a minimalist take on a traditional shingle-style home.

A pop and contemporary art collection paired with sculptural furniture gives a cool, collected vibe to interior designer Martha Angus's home.

Landscape architecture firm Strata and architect Noel Cross design an estate to be at one with nature.

Architect Charlie Barnett fulfilled the homeowner's dream of a spacious, light-filled retreat inspired by International Style architecture.

“I’m drawn to masters like Nakashima," says Danielson, "because I admire the restraint and discipline it takes to simply celebrate the material and ‘design less.’"

When Chesney's commissioned her to create a line of hearths, Suzanne Tucker let the romantic, visual history of France and Italy fuel her imagination.

“They find beautiful, simple ways to solve problems,” says homeowner Michael Ingram Jones of design partners Brian Messana and Toby O’Rorke.

Cantilevered white planes, graphic shadows and pure Modernist lines distinguish the façade of a building that sits at a point where Cow Hollow juts out and overlooks Pacific Heights. “It was built in 1959, and it was, well, ugly,” says architect Julie Dowling, recalling her first impressions.

Cantilevered white planes, graphic shadows and pure Modernist lines distinguish the façade of a building that sits at a point where Cow Hollow juts out and overlooks Pacific Heights. “It was built in 1959, and it was, well, ugly,” says architect Julie Dowling, recalling her first impressions.

I grew up street-smart in London. I window-shopped on my way to school; my favorite toy was a cash register; traffic noise lulled me to sleep. In other words, I was a confirmed city kid. The countryside? Definitely alien territory. As an adult, I’ve always lived and preferred to vacation in cities, and my work has often kept me on the road. Then a few years ago I realized that my NoHo apartment was almost becoming like another hotel room—a pit stop in my peripatetic life.

I grew up street-smart in London. I window-shopped on my way to school; my favorite toy was a cash register; traffic noise lulled me to sleep. In other words, I was a confirmed city kid. The countryside? Definitely alien territory. As an adult, I’ve always lived and preferred to vacation in cities, and my work has often kept me on the road. Then a few years ago I realized that my NoHo apartment was almost becoming like another hotel room—a pit stop in my peripatetic life.

"Beige is Atmosphere. It’s ivory, it’s cream, it’s stone, it’s toast, it’s cappuccino. It’s well, it’s magic.” Though a phrase attributed to the legendary interior designer Albert Hadley, it might well have been said by designer Benjamin Dhong. “I never need a reason to design a neutral room,” says Dhong. “Layered, textural monochromes can be glorious and exciting. And unlike bold color, they’re never disconcerting; they never give me whiplash!”

The chic, simple and unadorned style of James Hunter’s client, Juli Betwee, inspired his vision for her 2,000-square-foot Millennium Tower apartment. “Her stylishness brought to mind the clean, modern lines and subtle curves in the furniture Jean-Michel Frank and William Haines designed in the 1930s,” says Hunter, a principal designer at the Wiseman Group. “I knew an updated take on that sensibility would soften the space’s strong geometry.”

"Beige is Atmosphere. It’s ivory, it’s cream, it’s stone, it’s toast, it’s cappuccino. It’s well, it’s magic.” Though a phrase attributed to the legendary interior designer Albert Hadley, it might well have been said by designer Benjamin Dhong. “I never need a reason to design a neutral room,” says Dhong. “Layered, textural monochromes can be glorious and exciting. And unlike bold color, they’re never disconcerting; they never give me whiplash!”

Bernard Trainor’s first impression of the land surrounding a house on a stretch of Big Sur coast was that it felt dispirited and inhospitable: A harsh climate of drenching rains, mists and howling winds had taken its toll and left the property fractured from its stunning Pacific view. Responding to the sound of crashing waves, his intuition told him to simply uncover a sense of place.

Bernard Trainor’s first impression of the land surrounding a house on a stretch of Big Sur coast was that it felt dispirited and inhospitable: A harsh climate of drenching rains, mists and howling winds had taken its toll and left the property fractured from its stunning Pacific view. Responding to the sound of crashing waves, his intuition told him to simply uncover a sense of place.

Ivory shades like White Dove and chalky Clunch predominate in architect Barbara Chambers’ project binders. This rigrously achromatic aesthetic extends from the residences she designs to her own understated wardrobe and even her elegant presence, which whispers rather than shouts.

Ivory shades like White Dove and chalky Clunch predominate in architect Barbara Chambers’ project binders. This rigrously achromatic aesthetic extends from the residences she designs to her own understated wardrobe and even her elegant presence, which whispers rather than shouts.