Author: Photographs by Marili Forastieri

Personal items throughout a Washington Depot home reflect the varied chapters of the owners’ lives.

Personal items throughout a Washington Depot home reflect the varied chapters of the owners’ lives.

A 1978 contemporary in East Hampton’s Northwest Woods is a stunning testament to personal style.

At home in Brooklyn, decorator Rodney Lawrence has amassed a treasure trove of curiosities.

In 114 years, just two families have lived in this shingled, 1903 classic known as the Dahlias.

After two previous renovations left their duplex with an awkward layout, a couple enlisted Brooklyn-based O'Neill Rose Architects to give it an airy, loft-like feel.

After two previous renovations left their duplex with an awkward layout, a couple enlisted Brooklyn-based O'Neill Rose Architects to give it an airy, loft-like feel.

Contemporary sculpture, antiques, and pop art live in perfect harmony in Marsia Holzer’s apartment on Central Park West.

The stress often associated with owning a second or even a third or fourth home doesn’t faze Michael Bruno in the least. He already owns a venerable house in Tuxedo Park and a New York apartment, but when a Grosvenor Atterbury mansion became available last year on Coopers Neck Lane, Bruno and his partner, Alexander Jakowec, couldn’t resist.

Mark Perry’s process as an abstract painter is anything but straightforward. His work, he explains, results from a sort of loose exploration with paint. “I pick up the paint and put it down, leave it alone, do it again, and listen to the inner voice telling me when to stop,” says the artist, who fashions intense, lovely oils, amalgams of color with nature-based titles such as Land & Sea, Earth Green Water Blue, Dunes Revisited, and Accabonac, named for the well-known harbor in Springs.

It takes rare vision and prodigious creativity to carve a family home out of a former cinderblock factory, especially one on a steeply sloping Sagaponack lot that had once been quarried for sand. “Basically, we bought a crater covered with weeds and out-of-control poison ivy,” says homeowner Quentin Curry, a multidisciplinary artist and self-styled “idea guy” whose unique talents enabled him, along with his wife, fashion designer Shelley Suh, and Sag Harbor architect Nilay Oza, to create an unconventional 4,600-square-foot compound with what Curry calls “a rural, industrial ranch vibe.”

Mark Perry’s process as an abstract painter is anything but straightforward. His work, he explains, results from a sort of loose exploration with paint. “I pick up the paint and put it down, leave it alone, do it again, and listen to the inner voice telling me when to stop,” says the artist, who fashions intense, lovely oils, amalgams of color with nature-based titles such as Land & Sea, Earth Green Water Blue, Dunes Revisited, and Accabonac, named for the well-known harbor in Springs.

It takes rare vision and prodigious creativity to carve a family home out of a former cinderblock factory, especially one on a steeply sloping Sagaponack lot that had once been quarried for sand. Artist Quentin Curry and his wife, Fashion Designer Shelley Suh enlists the help of Sag Harbor Architect Nilay Oza.

Paris comes to the city in this New York apartment. Susannah Hunnewell and her decorator Fawn Galli, create the perfect home to start a new chapter for Hunnewell.

When decorator Mary Foley decided to buy a cottage in Southampton, she let intuition be her guide.

In Williamsburg, change has been virtually unknown for decades, Goicolea raised eyebrows when he transformed 1,200-square-foot row houses into a soaring, vaguely brutalist 2,000 square-foot wood and concrete structure into his own...