Author: Michael Lassell

Sally Quinn and Ben Bradlee restore East Hampton’s legendary Beale residence to its original grandeur.

Tucked into the dunes in Water Mill, a no-frills cottage gets a stylish, sensitive update.

When longtime clients of Anthony Baratta purchased property in the Hamptons for a summer vacation home, they immediately contacted the design dynamo to help them create a suitable manor for their large family. Working with architect Ernest Schieferstein, Baratta and his former partner William Diamond concocted an imposing home with two gambrel-roofed wings separated by ample public spaces. This being the East End, cedar shingles were the natural choice for the exterior.

Gillette was cautiously smitten with Hudson’s rich architectural history and abundant antiques and home design shops, so he packed up and moved there.

Designers Eric Cohler and Tony Klein make a prewar Park Avenue duplex into something entirely unexpected.

"When I initially met my client,” decorator David Scott recalls, “he had a loose-leaf file of all his art and furniture. I was deeply impressed and happy to be working for someone who was so organized. The art itself was edgier than I am used to working with, which was another level of excitement for me. It was an opportunity to learn.” Located in Chelsea’s Walker Tower, which was built in 1929 and converted from commercial space to 50 multimillion-dollar lofts in 2013, the apartment not only has considerable art, but also breathtaking views both south and west.

"When I initially met my client,” decorator David Scott recalls, “he had a loose-leaf file of all his art and furniture. I was deeply impressed and happy to be working for someone who was so organized. The art itself was edgier than I am used to working with, which was another level of excitement for me. It was an opportunity to learn.” Located in Chelsea’s Walker Tower, which was built in 1929 and converted from commercial space to 50 multimillion-dollar lofts in 2013, the apartment not only has considerable art, but also breathtaking views both south and west.

Nathan Orsman describes his first house in the Hamptons as a “typical East End beach shack in Noyac,” although his husband, Jose Castro, remembers it a bit differently. “It was such a wreck when we bought it that I cried,” he recalls. “But it turned out to be the cutest cottage ever.”

Nathan Orsman describes his first house in the Hamptons as a “typical East End beach shack in Noyac,” although his husband, Jose Castro, remembers it a bit differently. “It was such a wreck when we bought it that I cried,” he recalls. “But it turned out to be the cutest cottage ever.”

Architect James D’Auria and his wife, Jennifer, a real estate agent, lived for some 15 years in a home James designed on a bucolic plot of farmland in Amagansett. When he built the house, a shingled but modern-inflected structure that references the East End’s barn vernacular, the couple also had a place in Manhattan. But they were spending so little time in town, they eventually gave it up.

Architect James D’Auria and his wife, Jennifer, a real estate agent, lived for some 15 years in a home James designed on a bucolic plot of farmland in Amagansett. When he built the house, a shingled but modern-inflected structure that references the East End’s barn vernacular, the couple also had a place in Manhattan. But they were spending so little time in town, they eventually gave it up.

"When we met our clients,” recalls Hamptons-based architect Kevin O’Sullivan, “we had no idea that they had a spectacular collection of modern art.” And his clients had no idea that the man they were trusting to design their four-bedroom home had once been accepted to pursue painting and sculpture at the prestigious Edinburgh College of Art in his native Scotland.

"When we met our clients,” recalls Hamptons-based architect Kevin O’Sullivan, “we had no idea that they had a spectacular collection of modern art.” And his clients had no idea that the man they were trusting to design their four-bedroom home had once been accepted to pursue painting and sculpture at the prestigious Edinburgh College of Art in his native Scotland.

The Oslo-born designer, Bernt Heiberg, half the firm of New York–based Heiberg Cummings, was instantly attracted to the small two-story Victorian with its cedar shakes and ornate porch. His partner in all things, William Cummings, who is as American as Colorado, California, and Georgia, where he was raised, was all for it the minute they saw the interior.

The Oslo-born designer, Bernt Heiberg, half the firm of New York–based Heiberg Cummings, was instantly attracted to the small two-story Victorian with its cedar shakes and ornate porch. His partner in all things, William Cummings, who is as American as Colorado, California, and Georgia, where he was raised, was all for it the minute they saw the interior.

One57, the 90-story residential tower that the Extell Development Company was recently erected across the street from Carnegie Hall, left little to chance, the recruitment of top New York designer Jamie Drake to create the building’s luxurious model apartment came from an unscheduled meeting in the lobby.

One57, the 90-story residential tower that the Extell Development Company was recently erected across the street from Carnegie Hall, left little to chance, the recruitment of top New York designer Jamie Drake to create the building’s luxurious model apartment came from an unscheduled meeting in the lobby.

When you descend from a family whose name has been identified with luxury Venetian silks, velvets, and damasks for five generations, where else would you live but in one of the exotic floating city’s most venerable palazzi? And so it is with Andrea Rubelli, who resides with his wife, Sandrina, and their son, Leonardo, in a building near the Grand Canal that was old before Columbus arrived in the Americas.

When you descend from a family whose name has been identified with luxury Venetian silks, velvets, and damasks for five generations, where else would you live but in one of the exotic floating city’s most venerable palazzi? And so it is with Andrea Rubelli, who resides with his wife, Sandrina, and their son, Leonardo, in a building near the Grand Canal that was old before Columbus arrived in the Americas.

In the course of his career, Sanders has developed a signature look he calls “New American Style,” and he’s known for designing homes that are rooted in tradition. But this apartment, with its many mid-20th-century pieces by Eames, Wegner, Wormley, Saarinen, and others, is more overtly contemporary than most of the work he has done for his clients. “‘New American Style,’” Sanders elaborates, “is about warmth, and creating spaces people feel comfortable in. There’s no velvet rope.

It was 1981, and Tom Fallon had no intention of buying a new house. A designer and creative brand executive who worked with Bill Blass for 20 years before branching out on his own, Fallon had received an invitation from industry pal Joanne Creveling to visit her house on Shelter Island one weekend. He and Creveling had met in the 1960s, when Fallon was working at Bergdorf Goodman as Halston’s assistant and Creveling was beginning her stellar career as a publicist.

When longtime clients of Anthony Baratta purchased property in the Hamptons for a summer vacation home, they immediately contacted the design dynamo to help them create a suitable manor for their large family. Working with architect Ernest Schieferstein, Baratta and his former partner William Diamond concocted an imposing home with two gambrel-roofed wings separated by ample public spaces. This being the East End, cedar shingles were the natural choice for the exterior.