Author: Rebecca Morse

Ghoulish goings-on are not uncommon when it comes to real estate in the big, bad city. Predatory agents, surprise assessments, and untrustworthy superintendents can make urban dwelling a decidedly scary proposition. But nothing’s more frightening than the otherworldly spirits that some people believe live among us.

What’s jammed with celebrities and on the rise? The elevator at 155 Franklin Street in Tribeca, otherwise known as the Sugar Loaf Building. Dating from 1882 and located on a cobblestone block between Hudson and Varick streets, the condo is luring headliners left and right. Soon after Taylor Swift took up residence in the 8,300-square-foot penthouse (which she bought from Lord of the Rings director Peter Jackson for $19.95 million in March), Orlando Bloom reportedly scooped up a $4.875 million, 2,400-square-foot, three-bedroom loft with wood-beamed ceilings on the fourth floor. Meanwhile, director Steven Soderbergh is hopping off for good, recently selling his 3,500-square-foot, third-floor apartment for $6 million.

It’s model season, but those willowy beauties marching down New York’s runways for Fashion Week aren’t the only game in town. The city’s new condo developments are turning heads more than ever before. They’re tall, they’re skinny, they don’t wake up for less than $3,000 a square foot (give or take), and they’re ready for their close-ups.

Looking for the newest up-and-coming neighborhood? Go east, young man—but not the East Village or the Lower East Side. Formerly stodgy Yorkville is now the coolest kid on the block. Yorkville? Yes, the area from Third Avenue to the East River between 79th and 96th streets will soon be filled with the rumbling of the Second Avenue subway—and increased real estate prices, no doubt. The enclave has always been popular with families—especially those with children at Chapin, Brearley, the Town School, and P.S. 158—and outdoorsy types who appreciate the greenery of Carl Schurz Park.

In Bridgehampton, two artists prove that “long days at the office” and “more time with the family” need not be mutually exclusive terms.

Architect Rick Staub designed the 9,000-square-foot structure as a series of pods sited on the footprint of the original house, stepped up and angled slightly to capture views of the Connecticut River and the hills of Lyme.

Architect Rick Staub designed the 9,000-square-foot structure as a series of pods sited on the footprint of the original house, stepped up and angled slightly to capture views of the Connecticut River and the hills of Lyme.

With their daughters grown, Karen and Aaron Diamond had toyed for years with the idea of moving. “We’d been here for almost 35 years,” Karen Diamond says of their three-bedroom apartment in a 1927 building on Riverside Drive. “But we’ve always loved the Upper West Side, and why leave something we loved? So we stayed.”

Bobbi Stuart brings a tidal wave of crisp color and nautical detail to a Vineyard-inspired family home.

Nancy Fishelson sheds some light on an 18th-century home with a renovation that opened up ceilings, walls, and a view into the past.

A New York City family of seven finds that moving to the suburbs can be an entirely colorful experience.

At Denemede—an early 20th-century Fairfield property once celebrated for its majestic collection of pines—a new generation has taken root.

Is the open kitchen closing up shop? In a return to proportion and with an emphasis on efficiency, kitchen design is undergoing a sea change, and women are leading the charge

Departing from Palm Beach’s dizzying pink-and-green past, Jennifer Garrigues saturates 
a couple’s vacation home with a vibrant, fresh and utterly sophisticated palette