Author: Photographs by Rob Cardillo

Frederick Bland's goal was to craft an exuberant romp of texture, color and form.

For Mark Drendel, the ringside seat to a hayfield framing the Shepaug River brought him back to his childhood on his family’s Tennessee farm and he fell for this Litchfield County house. He couldn’t resist the relaxed allure of rocking chairs and a porch swing. The full ambiance of the one-acre property clinched the deal when Drendel and his partner, Chad Conway, bought the Roxbury home in 2002.

For Mark Drendel, the ringside seat to a hayfield framing the Shepaug River brought him back to his childhood on his family’s Tennessee farm and he fell for this Litchfield County house. He couldn’t resist the relaxed allure of rocking chairs and a porch swing. The full ambiance of the one-acre property clinched the deal when Drendel and his partner, Chad Conway, bought the Roxbury home in 2002.

Seven years ago, Casey and Chuck Berg purchased Turkey Hill in Westport. There are certain specific, unavoidable issues involved with taking ownership of—without a doubt—the most-photographed garden in the universe. Simply put, no one wants to be the person who killed Martha’s garden.

What happens when two gardeners make too many forays to Britain and return home laden with visions? An estate emerges and rocks roll. But first, they had to find a way in. Instead of a swank house or even a driveway, the stone walls were the deal clincher. And it’s fortunate that the two found the on-site masonry so compelling, because the rocks played a starring role in the taming of Plum Creek Farm.

When Rick Angiollo and Ken Stiles found themselves between a rock and a hard place, they changed course and went natural.

Jayne Bentzen unearths hidden treasures while guiding her Connecticut garden through rites of passage