Author: Photographs by Willie Cole

After a tree crashed through their home during Hurricane Sandy, this couple adopted a lemons-to-lemonade approach and began a thoughtful redesign.

After a tree crashed through their home during Hurricane Sandy, this couple adopted a lemons-to-lemonade approach and began a thoughtful redesign.

An interior designer returns to her hometown of Westport to establish her business and life in a charming cottage.

Design duo Forehand and Lake deliver simply sophisticated interiors in a new Compo Beach colonial.

Aimee Carpenter, a former graphic designer for Martha Stewart and current craftsman and photographer, brought not only her desires for a rural retreat to the architectural table, but also what Wagner calls her “incredibly imaginative” creative spirit.

'Twas 14 Years ago when Designer Rebecca Ellsley bought a run-down log home in the Old Hill section of Westport. “It was in terrible condition,” she recalls. “The roof leaked—you could see daylight between all the logs.” Though it might have seemed like a huge undertaking for a 30-year-old, Ellsley was up to the task. She grew up in a European-style hunting lodge her mother, Beverly, the founder of Beverly Ellsley Designs, had restored in the mid ’70s. “I love log homes,” she says. “It was a big nut to take, but who else was going to save it?”

'Twas 14 Years ago when Designer Rebecca Ellsley bought a run-down log home in the Old Hill section of Westport. “It was in terrible condition,” she recalls. “The roof leaked—you could see daylight between all the logs.” Though it might have seemed like a huge undertaking for a 30-year-old, Ellsley was up to the task. She grew up in a European-style hunting lodge her mother, Beverly, the founder of Beverly Ellsley Designs, had restored in the mid ’70s. “I love log homes,” she says. “It was a big nut to take, but who else was going to save it?”

Most people seek to avoid high drama in life. Michael Tubis, an antiques dealer and interior designer, and his partner, Dr. Stuart Bentley, encourage it. “There’s drama to be found in every room, and we work to foster that,” says Tubis of their 9,000-square-foot contemporary house situated on a private road in Greenwich. “Everyone who comes to one of our huge parties says the same thing upon walking inside, ‘Wow.’ Even I can’t stop saying it every time I come back home.”

Most people seek to avoid high drama in life. Michael Tubis, an antiques dealer and interior designer, and his partner, Dr. Stuart Bentley, encourage it. “There’s drama to be found in every room, and we work to foster that,” says Tubis of their 9,000-square-foot contemporary house situated on a private road in Greenwich. “Everyone who comes to one of our huge parties says the same thing upon walking inside, ‘Wow.’ Even I can’t stop saying it every time I come back home.”

Jane Capellini’s bucket list doesn’t include jumping out of a plane, climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro or trekking to the South Pole. Her list is all about houses—the ones she dreams about living in some day. She has crossed off a stone farmhouse in New Jersey, a Tudor in Greenwich, a townhouse in Manhattan, a villa in Tuscany, a loft in Dumbo and, now, a river cottage in Connecticut.

Words play a starring role in much of the art in this classic Fairfield County Colonial.