Connecticut Cottages & Gardens - January 2015

Deeds & Don'ts: Homes with Grand Kitchens

Realtors report that the heart of the home has to function as just that: a space to gather for family meals (sorry, dining room), entertain, do homework, watch movies, hang out and, oh yes, prepare food. The most common complaint about the kitchens in older homes is that they were designed as remote rooms for cooks and servants—a la Downton Abbey—with no connection to where family life is lived. So topping the “ideal kitchen” list is an easy flow into a family or great room, a formal dining room, preferably with a butler’s pantry, and doors that open onto a terrace for al fresco dining.

Brass Light Fixtures for Every Room

Add a bit of brass to the living room, dining room, kitchen or bath with one of these 21 brass light fixtures. From the Vivien flush mount comprised of natural brass and frosted glass in a fluted silhouette designer Alexa Hampton created for Circa Lighting to Arteriors' Yale small sconce comprised of hundreds of rows of delicate antique brass chains of staggering lengths are draped over a frame, each fixture adds its own a unique touch.

For High-End White Spirits, the Key is Using Water Straight from the Source

For years I’ve journeyed to faraway lands hoping to discover the real essence of things. Recently, in search of some of the best water on earth, I traveled to the North Atlantic’s remote land of fire and ice. I traversed Iceland’s lunar landscape for hours by jeep over winding dirt roads flanked by lava fields, volcanoes and glaciers before reaching the source—a fjord on the island’s west coast. Some of the world’s purest water—that which goes into Martin Miller’s Gin—bubbles up through black lava rocks.

Combine These 10 Ingredients for a Hassle-Free Kitchen

Say ciao to your favorite barista with Thermador’s built-in fully automatic coffee machine, kiss cabinet clutter goodbye with Porcelanosa’s plate drawer organizers crafted from wood and stainless steel, and display your fire saftey tools with pride thanks Boffi’s Minimal series domestic extinguisher. Each of these stylish design objects make for a hassle-free kitchen.

Cool Whites Begone: This Year's Biggest Trend in Kitchen Design is Heading into the Woods for a Warmer Shade of Pale

A place for everything and everything in its place was the mantra for this kitchen by Rose Adams of Rose Adams Cabinetry & Design, who loves the challenge of working with an older home. A total redesign of the existing space involved removing everything down to the existing framing, then adding new plumbing, appliances, lighting, windows, venting system, storage and more. “We kept the existing floor,” says Adams. “It’s in keeping with the house and runs in the downstairs mudroom. It’s timeless and looks amazing—a must-keep.”

GALLERY Cool Whites Begone: This Year's Biggest Trend in Kitchen Design is Heading into the Woods for a Warmer Shade of Pale

A place for everything and everything in its place was the mantra for this kitchen by Rose Adams of Rose Adams Cabinetry & Design, who loves the challenge of working with an older home. A total redesign of the existing space involved removing everything down to the existing framing, then adding new plumbing, appliances, lighting, windows, venting system, storage and more. “We kept the existing floor,” says Adams. “It’s in keeping with the house and runs in the downstairs mudroom. It’s timeless and looks amazing—a must-keep.”

Elegant Yet Playful Details Define This Updated 19th-Century Fairfield County Victorian

When it was time for one Fairfield County couple to buy a bigger home to accommodate their growing family, they set their sights on a 19th-century Victorian with good bones. That was important to them, because they were more interested in renovating the existing structure than starting from scratch. We love old houses, says the wife. And we could never imagine tearing one down. Originally built in the 1860s, the house had undergone multiple renovations and expansions over the years--and it showed. It was a shell of its former self, says McKee (Mac) Patterson, whose firm, Austin Patterson Disston Architects spearheaded the transformation.

GALLERY Inspired by Styles from Rustic Barn to Classic Colonial, These Homeowners Turned to a Team of Experts to Build a Home That Captures the Best of New England’s Vernacular

Cruising through the picturesque countryside of Washington is like taking a journey back in architectural time. The Georgian, Greek Revival and shingle-style homes often paired with 19th-century barns or mill structures that dot the landscape represent the best of New England’s classic vernacular. Not surprisingly, many people who move there feel an obligation to maintain the status quo, and a Manhattan couple looking to set down part-time roots was no exception.

GALLERY Elegant Yet Playful Details Define This Updated 19th-Century Fairfield County Victorian

When it was time for one Fairfield County couple to buy a bigger home to accommodate their growing family, they set their sights on a 19th-century Victorian with good bones. That was important to them, because they were more interested in renovating the existing structure than starting from scratch. We love old houses, says the wife. And we could never imagine tearing one down. Originally built in the 1860s, the house had undergone multiple renovations and expansions over the years--and it showed. It was a shell of its former self, says McKee (Mac) Patterson, whose firm, Austin Patterson Disston Architects spearheaded the transformation.

Inspired by Styles from Rustic Barn to Classic Colonial, These Homeowners Turned to a Team of Experts to Build a Home That Captures the Best of New England's Vernacular

Cruising through the picturesque countryside of Washington is like taking a journey back in architectural time. The Georgian, Greek Revival and shingle-style homes often paired with 19th-century barns or mill structures that dot the landscape represent the best of New England’s classic vernacular. Not surprisingly, many people who move there feel an obligation to maintain the status quo, and a Manhattan couple looking to set down part-time roots was no exception.