Hamptons Cottages & Gardens - August-15 2015

House Tour: A Family-Friendly Home Overlooking Amagansett's Gardiners Bay

Houses by the water take Robert Young back to his childhood. A native of Boston, the architect grew up near the coast, where sailing was customary, as was owning a boat—particularly in his family, since his father was a boat dealer and built intricate model ships for fun. “The craftsmanship that goes into a boat is a balance between form and function,” Young says. “It’s similar to what I do when I design a house.”

Inside the Airy East Hampton Home of Architect James D’Auria

Architect James D’Auria and his wife, Jennifer, a real estate agent, lived for some 15 years in a home James designed on a bucolic plot of farmland in Amagansett. When he built the house, a shingled but modern-inflected structure that references the East End’s barn vernacular, the couple also had a place in Manhattan. But they were spending so little time in town, they eventually gave it up.

Grade Architecture + Interior Design Comes to Town

There’s a new name in town, and it’s not Stern, Stelle, or Skolnick. Grade Architecture + Interior Design, responsible for 100 Barclay Street, a luxury condominium building in Tribeca, is moving into the Hamptons spec house market. “We understand traditional values and also know that our clients live modern lifestyles, so we adjust accordingly,” says principal Thomas Hickey, who leads the firm with interior designer Edward Yedid.

This Issue's Big Deal Listing: 376 Gin Lane, Southampton

In a highly unusual development, a 1.8-acre oceanfront estate is possibly going back to the bank. Louise Blouin’s La Dune, at 376 Gin Lane in Southampton, is reportedly on the chopping block for an estimated pre-foreclosure price of $12,454,090. The owner of Louise Blouin Media, the publishing company responsible for Art + Auction and Modern Painters magazines and the art website BlouinArtInfo.com,

Tour the Comfortably Modern Sag Harbor Cove Home of Designer Allison Babcock

Morning runs have a way of clearing the head and exposing people to new possibilities, which is precisely what happened when Luke Babcock took off on an early a.m. jog one day in 2010. The couple—she an interior designer, he a finance professional—had moved to the Hamptons from New York City in 2003 and had been living in a traditional house nearby. But they were eager to find a more expansive home for themselves and their daughters. They also wanted to create a home they could really call their own—built from the ground up.

Step Inside the Masterful Amagansett Retreat of Architect Paul Masi

Harry Bates has been designing houses on Long Island since the early 1960s. Back then, the choice of materials was limited to “whatever you could get at the lumberyard,” says Bates, explaining the modesty of his early dwellings. But he still found ways to give his houses handsomely proportioned spaces, with crisp details that reflected serious architectural ambitions. His goal was always to do more with less.

Ceramist Mae Mougin Puts Her Stylish Stamp on Porcelain

A lifelong appreciation of beauty informs all of ceramist Mae Mougin’s work. A former fashion stylist and photographer’s muse, Mougin creates platters, plates, bowls, and decorative-yet-functional objects in her studio alongside Davis Creek in Southampton. “It’s a body of water that’s always in motion,” she says of the natural inspiration that lies just steps from her front door.

Step Inside the Masterful Amagansett Retreat of Architect Paul Masi

Harry Bates has been designing houses on Long Island since the early 1960s. Back then, the choice of materials was limited to “whatever you could get at the lumberyard,” says Bates, explaining the modesty of his early dwellings. But he still found ways to give his houses handsomely proportioned spaces, with crisp details that reflected serious architectural ambitions. His goal was always to do more with less.

Tour the Comfortably Modern Sag Harbor Cove Home of Designer Allison Babcock

Morning runs have a way of clearing the head and exposing people to new possibilities, which is precisely what happened when Luke Babcock took off on an early a.m. jog one day in 2010. The couple—she an interior designer, he a finance professional—had moved to the Hamptons from New York City in 2003 and had been living in a traditional house nearby. But they were eager to find a more expansive home for themselves and their daughters. They also wanted to create a home they could really call their own—built from the ground up.

House Tour: A Family-Friendly Home Overlooking Amagansett's Gardiners Bay

Houses by the water take Robert Young back to his childhood. A native of Boston, the architect grew up near the coast, where sailing was customary, as was owning a boat—particularly in his family, since his father was a boat dealer and built intricate model ships for fun. “The craftsmanship that goes into a boat is a balance between form and function,” Young says. “It’s similar to what I do when I design a house.”

Newly Listed: Two Modern Beach Homes that Shun Shingle-Style Architecture

Not looking to build but still want something pretty groovy? Consider 41 Hildreth Avenue in Bridgehampton, a 1975 contemporary designed by Gene Futterman, one of the “big three” Hamptons architects of the 1980s. A boxy structure with a conical section that encloses a spiral staircase, 41 Hildreth has been on and off the market for the past two years and was re-listed last fall after the current owner installed a pool in the front yard.

Inside the Airy East Hampton Home of Architect James D’Auria

Architect James D’Auria and his wife, Jennifer, a real estate agent, lived for some 15 years in a home James designed on a bucolic plot of farmland in Amagansett. When he built the house, a shingled but modern-inflected structure that references the East End’s barn vernacular, the couple also had a place in Manhattan. But they were spending so little time in town, they eventually gave it up.