Hamptons Cottages & Gardens - September 2015

The 2015 Hamptons Classic: Winners

The Grand Prix and Grand Finale take place every year as the Hampton Classic Horse Show winds up its hunter and jumper events at a luncheon that unofficially signals the end of the summer season in the Hamptons.. This is also when the Editor in Chief of HC&G (Hamptons Cottages & Gardens), Kendell Cronstrom selects the winning tabletop creations designed by some of the most talented designers. The table settings are created for their guests in the ringside VIP tent. The tables range from equestrian to beach themes settings all decorated with flowers, bushes and bright colors inspired by the beauty of the Hamptons.

Lighting Designer Nathan Orsman and Television Executive Jose Castro Enjoy the Good Life at Home in Water Mill

Nathan Orsman describes his first house in the Hamptons as a “typical East End beach shack in Noyac,” although his husband, Jose Castro, remembers it a bit differently. “It was such a wreck when we bought it that I cried,” he recalls. “But it turned out to be the cutest cottage ever.”

Anna and Emilia DeMauro Stitch Together a New Enterprise in East Hampton

Building a brand-new business can be a daunting proposition, though it’s usually less so with the support of a partner. Even better is when that partner is your sister, as Anna and Emilia DeMauro can attest. Working out of Anna’s art studio on Town Lane in East Hampton, the siblings have joined forces to make one-of-a-kind bags, belts, purses, and accessories from sumptuous imported Italian leather.

Former New York Ranger Scores with Renovated Southampton Village Farmhouse

When Sean Avery renovated a 2,800-square-foot, shingle-style farmhouse at 52 Prospect Street in Southampton Village, he endeavored to do more than just slap a new coat of paint on it. The former New York Ranger sought to score some major design points by creating a showplace for transitional architecture, which blends traditional and modern design concepts, such as shingle-style façades with black roofs and black trim.

The 2015 HC&G Innovation in Design Winners: Kitchen Design

The winning projects in the 2015 HC&G Innovation in Design Awards came courtesy of Kathryn Fee Architect/ Vital Habitats, Barnes Coy Architects, Berg Design Architecture/Rosemary Scollan Interior Design, Lori Margolis Interiors, and Mojo Stumer Associates.

The 2015 HC&G Innovation in Design Winners: Product Design

The winning projects in the 2015 HC&G Innovation in Design Awards came courtesy of Martin Architects, Nico Yektai, Elizabeth Dow, Remains Lighting, and Sylvetser & Co. at Home.

The 2015 HC&G Innovation in Design Winners: Garden Design

The winning projects in the 2015 HC&G Innovation in Design Awards came courtesy of Edmund Hollaner Landscape Architects, Laguadrdia Design Group, Oehme, Van Sweden & Associates, Inc., Pembrooke Fine Landscapes, and Whitefleet Design, Inc.

Entrepreneur Michael Bruno Savors the Graceful Beauty and Last Days of a Historic Gin Lane Carriage House

The stress often associated with owning a second or even a third or fourth home doesn’t faze Michael Bruno in the least. He already owns a venerable house in Tuxedo Park and a New York apartment, but when a Grosvenor Atterbury mansion became available last year on Coopers Neck Lane, Bruno and his partner, Alexander Jakowec, couldn’t resist.

After a Disastrous Fire Nearly Destroyed Her Water Mill Home, Decorator Wendy Seewagen Created it Anew

Some people collect baseball cards, and others vintage cars. Some even collect more offbeat objects, like moon rocks or Pez dispensers. Still others, like designer Wendy Seewagen, collect houses. The decorator loves the adventure of reinventing a structure entirely, and thinks nothing of knocking down a wall or constructing a staircase from scratch. What’s more, she would rather do the work by herself. A chore? Not for her.

The Decorating Duo Design House Kits Out a Sweet Southampton Cottage That's Brimming with Personality

Like most industries, the world of interior design is a competitive one. Even people with no training can decide to call themselves “decorators” and hang up their shingles, further populating an already crowded field. No one knows who will be the next Sister Parish or Mario Buatta, and especially in Manhattan, it’s more difficult than ever to stand out.